Walking the Streets

Story of a man's immigration journey from a primitive African village to the United States Air Force Academy as an international exchange cadet. Stark images of the dissonance between two worlds, one where poverty reigns and the other where goodwill outweighs good sense. This book reveals the epic struggle of immigrants everywhere searching for a better life in the United States, only to find that what they've left behind haunts them even past pledging their allegiance to a new flag of hope.  Adopting America contains vivid imagery of what it's like to try to exist within a world that is not your own--of how it feels to adopt the ways of the Western world. A true story of International Adoption intertwines with the plot to give a realistic view of what it's like to adopt children from a third world country and hope they adopt American ways.  This book also includes a detailed account of life as an international exchange cadet at the United States Air Force Academy, with contrasts to third world military systems in comparison to the more developed U.S. military.

Story of a man’s immigration journey from a primitive African village to the United States Air Force Academy as an international exchange cadet. Stark images of the dissonance between two worlds, one where poverty reigns and the other where goodwill outweighs good sense. This book reveals the epic struggle of immigrants everywhere searching for a better life in the United States, only to find that what they’ve left behind haunts them even past pledging their allegiance to a new flag of hope.
Adopting America contains vivid imagery of what it’s like to try to exist within a world that is not your own–of how it feels to adopt the ways of the Western world. A true story of International Adoption intertwines with the plot to give a realistic view of what it’s like to adopt children from a third world country and hope they adopt American ways.
This book also includes a detailed account of life as an international exchange cadet at the United States Air Force Academy, with contrasts to third world military systems in comparison to the more developed U.S. military.

‘walking on the street’ is Googled around 135,000 times per month globally.

Military Bar 010
Beer Joint in Cameroon
  crowdedstreet
Crowded Streets of Yaounde, Cameroon

My resident father wasn’t an alcoholic but then again alcoholics aren’t that easy to identify when glazed over eyes often signal hunger, not drunkenness.  Beer joints are so common in Cameroon, that it’s easier for someone to grab a beer than to grab a snack.  If you’ve ever been to an old time farmer’s market or outdoor flea market in the Deep South, you’ve seen something close to what all of Cameroon resembles—one big fairground where the scent of smoked meats and motorbike pollution runs wild. The streets are lined with small time vendors who are selling anything from recycled water bottles to Nike knockoffs.  In the city of Yaoundé and Doula, the two largest cities in Cameroon, the streets are so crowded, you are hard pressed to find your own way because there is usually one big movement of individuals tightly rubbing shoulders, all going in the same direction—kind of like the halls of a public high school where the weakest individuals easily get lost in the congested mix and often end up reporting to the wrong homeroom.  The first time I found myself walking the streets, at my initial arrival in the city, I felt a lot like the pre-pubescent adolescent that I was, completely obsessed with what other people thought of me—wondering if the city slickers noticed how hard it was for me to keep walking without getting knocked down.    I later realized that no one cared.  They actually just wanted to get where they were going without any clumsy obstacles in their way.  So I learned to walk fast and dart in and out and under so that I could stay out of the way of everyone who always seemed to have somewhere more important to go.    After a few weeks of practice shuffling through the streets, I felt like an expert when someone else would run into me and I still managed to stay standing.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s