Missing Home

Story of a man's immigration journey from a primitive African village to the United States Air Force Academy as an international exchange cadet. Stark images of the dissonance between two worlds, one where poverty reigns and the other where goodwill outweighs good sense. This book reveals the epic struggle of immigrants everywhere searching for a better life in the United States, only to find that what they've left behind haunts them even past pledging their allegiance to a new flag of hope.  Adopting America contains vivid imagery of what it's like to try to exist within a world that is not your own--of how it feels to adopt the ways of the Western world. A true story of International Adoption intertwines with the plot to give a realistic view of what it's like to adopt children from a third world country and hope they adopt American ways.  This book also includes a detailed account of life as an international exchange cadet at the United States Air Force Academy, with contrasts to third world military systems in comparison to the more developed U.S. military.

Story of a man’s immigration journey from a primitive African village to the United States Air Force Academy as an international exchange cadet. Stark images of the dissonance between two worlds, one where poverty reigns and the other where goodwill outweighs good sense. This book reveals the epic struggle of immigrants everywhere searching for a better life in the United States, only to find that what they’ve left behind haunts them even past pledging their allegiance to a new flag of hope.
Adopting America contains vivid imagery of what it’s like to try to exist within a world that is not your own–of how it feels to adopt the ways of the Western world. A true story of International Adoption intertwines with the plot to give a realistic view of what it’s like to adopt children from a third world country and hope they adopt American ways.
This book also includes a detailed account of life as an international exchange cadet at the United States Air Force Academy, with contrasts to third world military systems in comparison to the more developed U.S. military.

‘I miss home’ is Googled around 90,000 times per month globally.
Sometimes I miss home.  They say that home is where the heart is.  But since my arrival in the United States, my heart has felt torn between two very beautiful places that appeal to different parts of who I have become.  I’ve seen my appetite change in a way that I find myself accepting things for which I didn’t even know I’d already acquired a taste.   The taste of freedom hasn’t been much different than my initial distaste for cheese—in reverse.  In general, it isn’t necessary to acquire a taste for freedom, but one must realize that human rights aren’t meant for drive-through consumption.  When outside looking in, it is easy to appreciate the value of what you don’t have.  But once comfortable consumption becomes our lifestyle—we stop eating healthy—and eventually start turning our noses up at what we at one time knew was a better choice.  Enjoying freedom is easy.  Loathing the rising cost of what it affords is easier.  Putting patriotism on auto-pilot, while having one foot in America and one foot out—the danger is that immigrants tend to feel and behave like illegitimate children who have no place to go.  I know what it’s like to spend more time than not, wondering where I really belong—here or there.   And when you don’t have the usual things to blame for your discontentment because in everyone else’s eyes you’ve already “made it”—it gets increasingly convenient to accuse the father or fatherland whose divided loyalties are bound by nothing but law for settling disputes.

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