African Fire

Story of a man's immigration journey from a primitive African village to the United States Air Force Academy as an international exchange cadet. Stark images of the dissonance between two worlds, one where poverty reigns and the other where goodwill outweighs good sense. This book reveals the epic struggle of immigrants everywhere searching for a better life in the United States, only to find that what they've left behind haunts them even past pledging their allegiance to a new flag of hope.  Adopting America contains vivid imagery of what it's like to try to exist within a world that is not your own--of how it feels to adopt the ways of the Western world. A true story of International Adoption intertwines with the plot to give a realistic view of what it's like to adopt children from a third world country and hope they adopt American ways.  This book also includes a detailed account of life as an international exchange cadet at the United States Air Force Academy, with contrasts to third world military systems in comparison to the more developed U.S. military.

Story of a man’s immigration journey from a primitive African village to the United States Air Force Academy as an international exchange cadet. Stark images of the dissonance between two worlds, one where poverty reigns and the other where goodwill outweighs good sense. This book reveals the epic struggle of immigrants everywhere searching for a better life in the United States, only to find that what they’ve left behind haunts them even past pledging their allegiance to a new flag of hope.
Adopting America contains vivid imagery of what it’s like to try to exist within a world that is not your own–of how it feels to adopt the ways of the Western world. A true story of International Adoption intertwines with the plot to give a realistic view of what it’s like to adopt children from a third world country and hope they adopt American ways.
This book also includes a detailed account of life as an international exchange cadet at the United States Air Force Academy, with contrasts to third world military systems in comparison to the more developed U.S. military.

‘African fire’ is Googled around 12,000 times per month globally.
Aside from each of us just trying to make it on our own, there were times of communal progress where we could at least all agree that we were hungry and wanted something to eat.  At these times we would click into place like a well oiled machine and assume our individual duties to scrape together a meal that would get us by until the next time.  My job as one of the youngest was to gather small sticks for starting the fire.  A menial job but nonetheless important because should everyone decide they were too good to fetch firewood, our modest cuisine would go uncooked.

In African villages, I think it would be safe to say the fire is the cornerstone of everyday life, around which you might eat, sleep, play, gossip, fight and even grieve a lost loved one.  There’s always something that makes home seem like home, an aroma that even if blindfolded, lets you know you’re there now.  One of the first things you’ll notice when arriving in Cameroon and any other country predominately characterized by underdevelopment, are fires of every size lining the landscape, lighting the way.  I’ve heard that if it’s your first time visiting such a place, the fires can seem daunting, unwelcome warnings about the dangers of flippant sight seeing.  But for me, upon returning home, the bright flashes of fire just sideline what I always see first—a mom earning her day’s wages cooking seasoned fish fried to perfection, a young boy standing in the shadow of its light trying his best to win over the affection of his life’s love, or a father drinking the last sip he can afford in hopes of washing his cares away.

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